COVID-19 CASES FROM MAY 10-16

Given the increase in cases, balancing the public health need to know with protecting an individual’s privacy, I will begin publishing weekly updates in the district. To better protect privacy, I am combining the four elementary schools data together and will use “<6” to protect an individual’s privacy if the positivity cases are very low in a certain part of the district.

Here is our data from the week of May 10-16:
LevelPositive StudentsPositive StaffQuarantined StudentsQuarantined Staff
High School<6<6<6<6
Middle School<6<610<6
Elementary<6<615<6

Quarantines are due to both in school exposures and out of school exposures. Elementary data is combined to protect our small school cases from being identified.

Quarantined staff includes administrators, teachers, para-educators, custodians, secretaries, and food service. Quarantined staff also includes those that are waiting for COVID-19 testing results.

If your child is determined to be a close contact, the school district in consultation with Clinton County Public Health will contact you directly.

UPDATE ON THE CLINTON HIGH SCHOOL RENOVATION

After a two week period of processing and evaluating a low bid that was $8.8 million more than the projected estimate, the Clinton Community School Board approved a contract with Tricon, a general contractor out of Dubuque to begin construction in June.  The reasons for the increase is the surge in steel, lumber, copper, and other raw materials due to the pandemic.

In order for the district to close this gap, multiple initiatives were considered.  If the idea significantly changed the scope of the building, it was rejected.  Value engineering ideas that were accepted have an estimated savings of $3.2 million. There are three deducts from the original bid that the Board accepted resulting in a $850,000 savings as well. 

Some examples of value engineering are switching from precast to block wall or replacing copper wiring with aluminum.  These changes will not change the scope of the project, meets city and state building codes, and have little to no effect in the long-term future of the high school.

The other part of the puzzle is to increase revenues to make-up for the shortfalls.  The school district will pay some parts (air quality, energy conversation) out of the ESSER III funds when appropriate.  School districts are allowed to petition the School Budget Review Committee to pay for furniture when building a new school.  Also, there will be a fundraising campaign for the renovation of Yourd Gym and the new performing arts center, two parts of the project that have no changes. We felt that given that Yourd and the new performing arts center have high community visibility and access, there would be a strong support to keep these two areas as originally designed.

There will be a groundbreaking ceremony announced in the next few weeks at the start of construction. The district appreciates the strong support of the community with the bond vote last March and are determined to construct a state of the art high school that will redefine how a high school environment will simulate the modern workplace.

COVID-19 CASES FROM MAY 3-9

Given the increase in cases, balancing the public health need to know with protecting an individual’s privacy, I will begin publishing weekly updates in the district. To better protect privacy, I am combining the four elementary schools data together and will use “<6” to protect an individual’s privacy if the positivity cases are very low in a certain part of the district.

Here is our data from the week of May 3-9:
LevelPositive StudentsPositive StaffQuarantined StudentsQuarantined Staff
High School<6<616<6
Middle School<6<615<6
Elementary<6<614<6

Quarantines are due to both in school exposures and out of school exposures. Elementary data is combined to protect our small school cases from being identified.

Quarantined staff includes administrators, teachers, para-educators, custodians, secretaries, and food service. Quarantined staff also includes those that are waiting for COVID-19 testing results.

If your child is determined to be a close contact, the school district in consultation with Clinton County Public Health will contact you directly.

COVID-19 CASES FROM APRIL 26-MAY 1

Given the increase in cases, balancing the public health need to know with protecting an individual’s privacy, I will begin publishing weekly updates in the district. To better protect privacy, I am combining the four elementary schools data together and will use “<6” to protect an individual’s privacy if the positivity cases are very low in a certain part of the district.

Here is our data from the week of April 26-May 1:
LevelPositive StudentsPositive StaffQuarantined StudentsQuarantined Staff
High School<6<6<6<6
Middle School<6<617<6
Elementary<6<619<6

Quarantines are due to both in school exposures and out of school exposures. Elementary data is combined to protect our small school cases from being identified.

Quarantined staff includes administrators, teachers, para-educators, custodians, secretaries, and food service. Quarantined staff also includes those that are waiting for COVID-19 testing results.

If your child is determined to be a close contact, the school district in consultation with Clinton County Public Health will contact you directly.

COVID-19 CASES FROM APRIL 19-25

Given the increase in cases, balancing the public health need to know with protecting an individual’s privacy, I will begin publishing weekly updates in the district. To better protect privacy, I am combining the four elementary schools data together and will use “<6” to protect an individual’s privacy if the positivity cases are very low in a certain part of the district.

Here is our data from the week of April 19-25:
LevelPositive StudentsPositive StaffQuarantined StudentsQuarantined Staff
High School<6<612<6
Middle School<6<611<6
Elementary<6<629<6

Quarantines are due to both in school exposures and out of school exposures. Elementary data is combined to protect our small school cases from being identified.

Quarantined staff includes administrators, teachers, para-educators, custodians, secretaries, and food service. Quarantined staff also includes those that are waiting for COVID-19 testing results.

If your child is determined to be a close contact, the school district in consultation with Clinton County Public Health will contact you directly.

COVID-19 CASES FROM APRIL 12-18

Given the increase in cases, balancing the public health need to know with protecting an individual’s privacy, I will begin publishing weekly updates in the district. To better protect privacy, I am combining the four elementary schools data together and will use “<6” to protect an individual’s privacy if the positivity cases are very low in a certain part of the district.

Here is our data from the week of April 12-18:
LevelPositive StudentsPositive StaffQuarantined StudentsQuarantined Staff
High School6<631<6
Middle School<6<630<6
Elementary<6<620<6

Quarantines are due to both in school exposures and out of school exposures. Elementary data is combined to protect our small school cases from being identified.

Quarantined staff includes administrators, teachers, para-educators, custodians, secretaries, and food service. Quarantined staff also includes those that are waiting for COVID-19 testing results.

If your child is determined to be a close contact, the school district in consultation with Clinton County Public Health will contact you directly.

Andy Grotelueschen—CHS Hall of Honor

A  Clinton High School student or 2020 graduate has researched and written the following article about one of the 2020 Hall of Honor inductees.  The induction ceremony will occur on Friday, April 16, at Clinton High School.

Andy Grotelueschen

The Arts

By Hillary Burken

Andy Groteluschen, of the Clinton High Graduating Class of 1998, is someone well known to every member of the CHS drama department. Andy joined his first drama production of The Wizard of Oz, in the 7th grade at Lyons Middle School, with encouragement from a good friend. Since then he fell in love wiAndy Groteluschen, of the Clinton High graduating class of 1998, is someone well known to every member of the CHS drama department. Andy joined his first drama production, “The Wizard of Oz,” in the 7th grade at Lyons Middle School, due to the encouragement from a good friend. Since then he has fallen in love with the theatre. He continued this love by partaking in drama through high school.

After graduation, Mr. Groteluschen went to Marquette and got his BA in theatre. From there he went on to get his MFA of Fine Arts from Brown, in 2005. He then joined a small group of his fellow actors, putting on shows. Together they performed in California, New York, and London. After working in many off-Broadway productions, he landed the role of Jeff in the revival of “Tootsie!” Throughout his career as an actor, he told himself, “All right, I can do this.”

Mr. Groteluschen continued to work on Broadway and in 2019, he was nominated for Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical in the 73rd annual Tony awards. When asked about this event, Mr. Groteluschen thought of the “love, family spirit, and comradery,” that he had experienced both at Clinton High and on the big stage of Broadway. When asked about the future, Mr. Groteluschen expressed his growing excitement about the reopening of Broadway’s main stages, and he is hopeful that he will be able to continue this love of the fine arts for many years.

Due to the pandemic, the Clinton High School Hall of Honor induction was postponed last year. The district is now planning to honor this strong class of inductees on Friday, April 16 at Clinton High School. The public will be invited for the luncheon and induction speech portion of the day. Social distancing, face coverings, and sanitation routines will be required.

The Clinton High School culinary students will cater the luncheon. Inductees will be guests of the Hall of Honor Committee. The luncheon will cost $10 per other attendees. Main entrees are Lasagne Al Forno (Italian Beef Lasagna) or Chicken Parmigiana (Chicken Parmesan). If you are interested in attending, please contact Deb Deters at ddeters@clintonia.org.

Charles Toney—CHS Hall of Honor

A  Clinton High School student or 2020 graduate has researched and written the following article about one of the 2020 Hall of Honor inductees.  The induction ceremony will occur on Friday, April 16, at Clinton High School.

Charles Toney

Humanitarian Endeavors

By Jack Marlowe

            “I prefer to think of the pleasant recollections I have of Clinton…” said Charles Toney in a 1976 letter.  Toney was a 1930 Clinton High School graduate who went on to become a national leader in equal opportunity efforts, programs, and results.  He was known in the Midwest as “Dean of Affirmative Action.”  Born in 1913 in La Crosse, Wisconsin, Toney lived in Clinton from age two until the end of first grade, and again in his teens.  While Toney fondly recalled his participation in wrestling, track, football and swimming at Clinton High (especially being instructed by renowned swim coach Howard Judd), he notes in the same letter that being denied access to Clinton’s new city pool because of the color of his skin was the beginning of his life’s work in civil rights.  “It is an oddity that the ultra-conservative community of Clinton contributed to my involvement in the Civil Rights movement.”

Toney at age 14 asked the Clinton City Attorney why he was not allowed to swim at Riverview Pool with the other children.  The answer he received was he couldn’t be in the same pool as white girls.

After graduation he attended St. Ambrose University and began working for John Deere in 1936.

In 1943, he and his soon-to-be wife Ann Palmer were denied service at Colonial Fountain, an ice cream shop in Davenport, which led to a case that ended as the first civil rights suit ever won in Iowa.

In 1965, Toney was the president of the Davenport Catholic Interracial Council and awarded Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom award which Dr. King accepted in person.

Toney and his wife owned one of the first black businesses, a barber/beauty shop, in central Davenport. The couple had the only in-ground swimming pool in the inner-city where they taught swim lessons to inner city youth as admission to public pools was still not permitted to people of color. They also published a magazine, Sepia Record, (now Ebony), which focused on racial injustices.

When Toney was hired by John Deere in 1936, the company sent him to welding school because of his good work ethic and ambition, subsequently making him the first welder of color in Iowa or Illinois. He worked as a welder for almost 20 years. He left in 1945, to work on organizing labor groups, but returned to Deere in 1947.  In 1964, he became a personnel representative and in 1968, was promoted to manager of minority relations and became the first African American at an executive level.   In 1972, he was again promoted to Director of Affirmative Action. While serving at the executive level, Toney began the first voluntary affirmative action plan in the nation, which later became federal law. Toney also initiated corporate wide recruiting for John Deere at historically black colleges.

Toney reflected leadership and pride in everything he did and served in many community roles such as the president of NAACP, Davenport chapter, Catholic Interracial Council, commissioner, and Iowa Civil Rights, commissioner, just to name a few.  He died in 2009 at age 96.  His wife Ann died three years later.

Due to the pandemic, the Clinton High School Hall of Honor induction was postponed last year. The district is now planning to honor this strong class of inductees on Friday, April 16 at Clinton High School. The public will be invited for the luncheon and induction speech portion of the day. Social distancing, face coverings, and sanitation routines will be required.

The Clinton High School culinary students will cater the luncheon. Inductees will be guests of the Hall of Honor Committee. The luncheon will cost $10 per other attendees. Main entrees are Lasagne Al Forno (Italian Beef Lasagna) or Chicken Parmigiana (Chicken Parmesan). If you are interested in attending, please contact Deb Deters at ddeters@clintonia.org.

COVID-19 CASES FROM APRIL 5-11

COVID

Given the increase in cases, balancing the public health need to know with protecting an individual’s privacy, I will begin publishing weekly updates in the district. To better protect privacy, I am combining the four elementary schools data together and will use “<6” to protect an individual’s privacy if the positivity cases are very low in a certain part of the district.

Here is our data from the week of April 5-11:
LevelPositive StudentsPositive StaffQuarantined StudentsQuarantined Staff
High School<6<611<6
Middle School<6<611<6
Elementary<6<615<6

Quarantines are due to both in school exposures and out of school exposures. Elementary data is combined to protect our small school cases from being identified.

Quarantined staff includes administrators, teachers, para-educators, custodians, secretaries, and food service. Quarantined staff also includes those that are waiting for COVID-19 testing results.

If your child is determined to be a close contact, the school district in consultation with Clinton County Public Health will contact you directly.

Joan Beck—CHS Hall of Honor

A current Clinton High School student or 2020 graduate has researched and written the following article about one of the 2020 Hall of Honor inductees.  The induction ceremony will occur on Friday, April 16, at Clinton High School.

Joan Beck

Professional Career Accomplishments

By Kyle Gassman

Joan Beck, (maiden name Joan Wagner), graduated from Clinton High School in 1941. She attended college at Northwestern University in Evanston, IL, earning her bachelor’s and master’s degree in journalism. In college she met and later married a classmate, Ernest Beck. They both graduated in 1945, but Beck worked on her master’s degree until 1947. One of her accomplishments in college was being the first woman editor for a student Newspaper, the Daily Northwestern. For a brief period Beck worked as a script writer for the “Voice of America” and a copywriter for “Marshall Field & Co.”

A few years later, after World War II, Beck started working at the Chicago Tribune. At the time, she was one of the very few women that worked outside the home. She went on to do several more things no woman had ever done. She became the first woman to edit a major section at the Tribune in 1972. In 1975, she was the first woman to join the Tribune’s editorial board. She then became the first woman to write a regular op-ed column in the Tribune titled, “You and Your Child,” which ran twice a week. That column was distributed to hundreds of other newspapers, making Joan Beck known nationally for her smart and humorous commentary on politics, women’s rights, and medical and social issues. She continued the column for almost 20 years, until she passed away in 1998.

At her home in Lake Forest, IL, Beck raised two children. Her daughter Melinda Beck followed her mom into journalism.  She worked as a writer and editor at Newsweek, and is now working at The Wall Street Journal where she wrote a column on medical issues.

One of Beck’s other accomplishments was writing several books over early childhood issues, including How to Raise a Brighter Child which was published in 1967 and sold worldwide, being translated in eight different languages. The book helped many adults to better understand parenting in an easier and more relaxed way. Throughout Beck’s life she has received numerous awards, including an outstanding alumnus award from Northwestern University and the prestigious American Society of Journalism’s award for best commentary in 1994. That same year she was inducted into the Chicago Journalism’s Hall of Fame.

Due to the pandemic, the Clinton High School Hall of Honor induction was postponed last year. The district is now planning to honor this strong class of inductees on Friday, April 16 at Clinton High School. The public will be invited for the luncheon and induction speech portion of the day. Social distancing, face coverings, and sanitation routines will be required.

The Clinton High School culinary students will cater the luncheon. Inductees will be guests of the Hall of Honor Committee. The luncheon will cost $10 per other attendees. Main entrees are Lasagne Al Forno (Italian Beef Lasagna) or Chicken Parmigiana (Chicken Parmesan). If you are interested in attending, please contact Deb Deters at ddeters@clintonia.org.